Whole House Counseling & Consultation

10945 Reed-Hartman Highway, Suite 201, Cincinnati, OH 45242     info@wholehouseconsultation.com      513.813.6415

There are many definitions of “integrative” health care, but all involve bringing conventional and complementary approaches together in a coordinated way.

Because Whole House serves clients with extensive trauma histories, we integrate traditional, conventional, alternative and complementary to give our clients the best possible tools to recovery. 

The use of integrative approaches to health and wellness has grown within care settings across the United States. Researchers are currently exploring the potential benefits of integrative health in a variety of situations, including pain management for military personnel and veterans, relief of symptoms in cancer patients and survivors, and programs to promote healthy behaviors.

Complementary Versus Alternative

Many Americans—more than 30 percent of adults and about 12 percent of children—use health care approaches developed outside of mainstream Western, or conventional, medicine. When describing these approaches, people often use “alternative” and “complementary” interchangeably, but the two terms refer to different concepts:

  • If a non-mainstream practice is used together with conventional medicine, it’s considered “complementary.”

  • If a non-mainstream practice is used in place of conventional medicine, it’s considered “alternative.”

  • Most people who use non-mainstream approaches use them along with conventional treatments.

Natural Products

This group includes a variety of products, such as herbs (also known as botanicals), vitamins and minerals and probiotics. They are widely marketed, readily available to consumers, and often sold as dietary supplements.

 

Mind and Body Practices

Yoga, meditation and massage among the most popular mind and body practices used by adults. Other mind and body practices include acupuncture, relaxation techniques  (such as breathing exercises, guided imagery, and progressive muscle relaxation), tai chi, qi gong, healing touch, hypnotherapy and movement therapies.

 

Other Complementary Health Approaches

The two broad areas discussed above—natural products and mind and body practices—capture most complementary health approaches. However, some approaches may not neatly fit into either of these groups—for example, the practices of traditional healers, Ayurvedic medicine, traditional Chinese medicine, homeopathy and naturopathy.

*https://nccih.nih.gov/health/integrative-health

“Transformation is an inside-out process.”